You are here

media

Small Successes

When GEOS went under, I suggested that the event to the die-off of the dinosaurs where the large schools would give way to the small, furry schools. Richard Smart has an uplifting and positive piece in The Japan Times on some thriving, smaller schools.(Pay no attention to the jaded guy he quotes throughout the article, though.)

See BS News

CBS News is all gaga over how awesome Japanese education is given how it stresses the importance of respect and how much they accomplish with so little is spent on it.

How do they do so much with so little? By investing in top-notch teachers.

"Teachers are given a good deal of respect; they're expected to devote their life," said Catherine Lewis, distinguished research scholar at Mills College. "The whole system is set up to emphasize the development of teachers."

Japanese Police Getting Slightly More Proactive

Police in Japan are remarkably reactive and don't spend much time or energy working on crime prevention. Besides stopping the occasional cyclist and verifying ownership of said bicycle, offering directions or taking a spin on their scooters, they remain very low-key, but they are a constant presence. The officers are largely relegated to their small community police boxes that are centrally located close to train stations all over the country. The policing approach has been one that is based on police officers maintaining a visible presence.

Japan Today Series on Eikaiwa

Japan Today has started a regular series on the state of the language school industry, in particular eikaiwa, written by Dean Rogers, president and CEO of Dean Morgan Co Ltd, the school that sounds like an investment company.

TBS Would Like to Hear From You

TBS correspondent in Australia, Hiroki Iijima, is covering the GEOS school closures and would like to hear from you.

Help him out. Contact him at: 0419 432 758 (mobile phone in Australia) or email hiroki [at] mcmstv.com.au.

Japan: 

More on Judgment Day

Here's some video to show you what I'm talking about when I wrote about Fuji TV using The Terminator as their election theme this year:

Milking the Bunny

G.communication continues to believe that the NOVA bunny has some value left in keeping it as the mascot of the company. I saw their latest commercial last night, not long after the news had broadcast that Sahashi had been found guilty and sentenced to prison. Here's the latest NOVA commercial.

Japan: 

Election 2009: Judgment Day

Flipping through the channels this evening, I nearly spat my dinner out as I landed on Fuji TV and caught one of their commercials for their coverage of the upcoming election. This is undoubtedly a historic election for Japan as all indications point to a major defeat of the LDP. So, how would you go about marking this momentous changing of the guard? Some sort of historical retrospective put to martial music? Something more somber with subdued trumpets in the background?

How about The Terminator?

The Japan Times Flames Itself

How did this get past the editors?

Regarding the Aug. 15 editorial "Dangerous revisionist sentiment": Little did I imagine that I would come across such an odious article. I totally agree with Toshio Tamogami, who has been bravely trying his best to convince the mentally retarded aliens who read The Japan Times that Japan was not at all to blame for World War II. The left is looking for ways to disgrace Japan, and The Japan Times is part of the left.

Japan: 

Darwin Meets Health Care

This should be a story about a candidate for the Darwin Awards:

With a belly full of food and sake, Armand Nelson Schneider just wanted to get rid of his nausea and empty his stomach before hopping on a train back to his study-abroad home in Yokohama, Japan.

Schneider, 22, was throwing up over the platform when a high-speed commuter zoomed into the station and smashed into him.

Japan: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - media